Category Archives: politics

No one stands for anything.

Our governor has failed us in his career as a politcian. He advertised himself as socially progressive yet economically conservative. However he has done neither.

Conservatives and liberals are severely skeptical of the governor and he deservingly needs to go. Arnold’s recent support for 40 billion worth of bonds for evreything and the kitchen sink will only mortgage the future generations of our state. Arnold’s failure to support equality legilsation is only a futile attempt to appease the base of his own party. Arnold should get back to his roots if he wants to lead.

Unless our governor can stand up against the unpopular elements of California politiocs, many voters will be tempted to look elsewhere. It seems for now the Libertarian Party offers the best candidate for governor. Arnold Schwarzenegger is truely indeed a RINO.

Political Realingment in California?

Can there be a political realignment towards the Republican Party? Thomas G. Del Beccaro thinks so. Californians understand that our state needs fiscal restraint and economic recovery to make sure we do not enter another fiscal crisis. We also are very law and order supporting bills such as Jessica’s Law which the Runner family has advocated this year. Lastly, we are strongly for making sure illegal immigrants do not attain benefits for living in our state illegally.

California Republicans do have a winning agenda except for the social issues. Proposition 187 was not the problem. The social issues are the problem. We should not force our candidates to adapt the stringent platform of the National and State Party when it relates to social issues. Pete Wilson is correct to explain why our state party has failed to win statewide elections compared to the Democratic party.

The Republican Party has loads of potential, just like how they do not want the Democratic Party to control our economic lives. Many of us in California do not want the Republican party to control our personal lives. Until this happens millions of Californians will trust the Democratic party instead despite the Republican Party’s superior stance on everything else.

Seriously, let them be.

Nell Soto and Gloria Negrette Mcleod both serve Democratic yet culturally conservative districts. I applaud both of these legislators for standing on their principles even though GLBT equality is one of the few issues that voters may disagree with them on.

No matter how much money Ben Lopez has to run against Nell Soto, being a social conservative advocate will not serve Ben Lopez in his run for State Assembly in the 2006 elections in district 61. Unless Mr.Lopez wants to dish out socialism with his social conservatism then he may have a chance in defeating long term legislator Nell Soto. Being anti-homosexual and anti-abortion will not earn brownie points with independents, center and left leaning Republicans.

I highly support State Senator Kuehl’s bill SB 1437 to incorporate the contributions of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community be incorporated in our social science text books in our public schools. An accurate portrayal of this often marginalized group will help reduce the ignorance and prejudice that these individuals often face. Opponents may say this is going to transform our public schools into miniature versions of Castro Street in San Fransisco, but this legislation is mainly intended to eliminate bias in our school curriculum and nothing more.

And today’s committee vote in the State Senate allows me the chance to thank Senator Nell Soto for sticking up for the GLBT people of California and their straight allies.

There are other bills that both sides are eagerly anticipating for in the coming weeks.
AB 606: This piece of legislation will give the state government enforcement power to school districts who fail to enforce anti discrimination laws.

AB 1056: Adds the GLBT community in tolerance instruction curriculum.

Campaign for Children and Families may say its about forcing and indoctrinating the youth of our state, all the advocates want is for the GLBT youth to learn in peace without being beaten up.

We cant spoon feed heterosexuality nor any alternative sexuality to any youth of our state. People will turnout the way they will turn out. However we can give support to those who are outside the majority.

These legislators need your love and support because you know Randy Thomason’s legion is going to hound these legislators left and right despite their guaranteed victory in November.

And our governor needs to stop being a sock puppet for the social conservatives, else he will probally have the same fate as Congressman Lungren in 1998.

Redistricting Reform Now!

The death of Proposition 77 was the death of some common sense into California politics. 2001’s party monopoly in redistricting resulted in a reduction of competitive districts and the reduction in mainstream Democrats and Republicans.

Take for example Assembly District 61, the district I ran my first major campaign for office. It was originally a Republican district, but since when Nell Soto the former city council woman of Pomona won the Democratic Party locked in the district. Aspiring Republicans of all political persuasions from left leaning Republican (myself), business conservative (Wapner), and just simply conservative (Yates) have thrown their time and money and still not able to claim victory.

Also we want politicians who are not as dogmatic towards other viewpoints. Of course George Runner and Jackie Goldberg may be full of conviction for their politics, most voters prefer pragmatic problem solvers. Where are the Pete Wilsons and Gray Davises of California? I know the party activists do not want to lose their base leaning politicians, but most centrists of both political parties do not want the dogmatic ones to dominate our government.

I just want districts that are not gerrymandered and districts not drawn up by currently serving politicians.

At least…

Although I may be a centrist Republican who is burned out by the Republican Party establishment. I am not totally against all Republicans running for office in 2006 in California.

Any Republican I disagree with will probably get a polite non vote. If conservatives in my local area could just simply not vote for Tom Campbell in 2000 when he ran against Dianne Feinstein, I could vote for someone else with enthusiasm.

Here are my Republicans of note for this June 2006 primary election.

Keith Richman – Treasurer

Inclusive Republican dedicated to the big issues that face our state as a whole. Assemblyman Richman has proposed solutions to solve our upcoming pension crisis and the numerous uninsured Californians that grow each year.

Abel Maldanado – Controller

The lesser of two evils. I am uncomfortable having Tony Strickland as the nominee. Due to the Strickland family using campaign money for their own personal gain.

Steve Poizner – Insurance Commissioner

He is the only one running in the Republican Party for this office, and if he was running against anyone else I would still vote for this man who almost won in a overwhelmingly Democratic party district in 2004.

I wish I was able to support Bruce McPherson for Secretary of State, but his certification of Diebold voting machines makes me uncomfortable to punch his name in the voting booth.

Lastly, our Governor does not deserve my support either. Governor Schwarzenegger is only a slave to the Democrats who want to put our state into fiscal peril, and to our own party who wants to restrict personal freedoms.

Initiatives

81 and 82 NO

Republican Party bleh…

I could understand that the Republican Party is having severe problems in the upcoming 2006 election. However they have called my home three times in the last week asking for money. None of my family is made of money and the Bush administration has failed our country.

Gas is rapidly approaching 4 dollars a gallon and our president has not implemented any reasonable solutions to lower the prices.
The insurgency still plagues Iraq, and has the mission really been accomplished? Many former generals in the Iraq conflict have said the leadership mishandled the effort.
And our president to ease his low poll numbers sells his soul to the evangelical crusaders by using wedge issues in order to win elections.
And the reconquistas want to invade our country so they could soak up the government services that their home countries have failed to provide them.

Our president is not doing anything substantial to make our nation a better place. Sadly Bush is only a lame duck now.

Empty Resolutions for Symbolism

The anti-war movement is in full swing especially with the resolutions against the war that failed in the city Los Angeles. However the machinery of war has already began. I would like to explain why these reasons are futile especially in the Inland Valley. Our federal legislators are Republican except for Joe Baca in Rialto and they would not change their position even if all ten thousand plus students of our campus came to their offices to raise hell with them. UC Riverside is a liberal oasis in a conservative town and the constituents of Ken Calvert’s district are more Republican and obviously more of a proponent of the ideas and practices of our president and the Republican dominated congress.

Resolutions are merely symbolic, they have little power to change hearts and minds of those people who make the decisions that affect the Middle Eastern crisis. I would rather have ASUCR concentrate on issues of parking, quality of food on campus, book store operations than issues that did not have importance than issues that they have very little power of. The energies should be focused primarily on legislators who speak for the side against the war, not in the territory that is a proponent for the war. For those students who are living on campus, but have residences elsewhere they should find out if a Democratic legislator represents them back at home and they should contact them to become more active for their cause.

Los Angeles City Councilman Jack Weiss mentions that he does not support either resolution because resolutions for or against the war are not relevant towards the business of the city. We have much more pressing issues despite where we live in the United States. Soldiers and their equipment have been delivered to the Middle East for the last month and it would be very pointless to send the troops home because they have been trained for action ready to serve in conflict. Despite how each of us may define if the war on Iraq is just, the Just War Theory can manipulated either for a pro or con position. We need to focus on improving our economy by providing jobs and opportunity, protecting our cities and people from external or internal threats.

Recalling Davis a Risky Impediment

By Matt Munson – Originally Published in the UC Riverside Highlander March 4th 2003

Last month the boards of the American Independent, Libertarian and Republican Party agree on one individual principle that Governor Davis should be removed from office. The opponents of a recall believe that our governor is dually elected and he should serve his time in office, while the proponents believe that our governor has committed so much fiscal errors that he nearly crippled our state government.

However, the Republican Party failed to offer a suitable candidate to beat Governor Davis during the November 2002 elections. If we only had a Republican nominee that would have had the confidence of the voters of the entire state, we may have had different leadership governing us today. The progressive reforms of Hiram Johnson give us the tools to remove negligent government officials and replace them with someone who truly represents the Californian voter. The problem with using the recall may portray the Republican Party however marginal even more irrelevant.

Notable Republicans including Assemblyman Dave Cox of Sacramento believe that a recall is merely a distraction towards the work the party needs to do such as working to construct alternatives to the Democratic Party’s budget plans. I agree with Assemblyman Cox that the recall should not be on the ballot, but if it does get on the ballot I will definitely remove our governor from leading our state. Recall is merely a gamble that may drain necessary funds from a party that is a half a million in the red. There are higher priorities of importance for the Republican Party in 2004. Defeating United States Senator Boxer and the long shot campaign to win California’s 55 electoral votes for the president should be of higher importance for the party in planning their upcoming political strategy.

Due to the low voter turnout, the requirements to recall the Governor has been easier to obtain despite the 12 percent requirement of the last vote for that respective office which is approximate to 900 thousand votes. Two proponents are organizing the campaign to recall the governor, People’s Advocate that helped to get Proposition 13 and a group organized by former Assemblyman Kaloogian of San Diego. However, People’s Advocate is the proponent who is quiet while Kaloogian’s group is the most vocal out of the bunch. Proponents must receive the necessary signatures within 160 days for an election that will be placed on the ballot during late summer if successful.

The charges filed against the governor are about how we were deceived on the condition of the state budget so the voters would not know how bad of shape our budget is. How our governor made our energy situation worse by implementing red tape in construction of electricity plants and implementing price caps that constrained the supply of energy. Gray Davis made many people unhappy including the Democratic dominated California Teachers Association where the governor has stalled the agenda of the union.

Governor Davis cannot be everything to everyone however, he will remain as the governor who came up as a prince and left as a disgraced fool. Nevertheless, I support our Governor crashing our state until it crumbles so in the future the Democratic Party would become irrelevant like the Republicans of today. Not rushing to a recall may benefit California in the end where they will realize voting for Democrats in general is not a wise move.

Simon’s failure endemic of state GOP’s woes

Originally Published November 11, 2002 – UCR Highlander

One of the several columns I wrote for the college paper during my tenure as a student at UC Riverside where I graduated with a BA in Political Science in ‘03.

The California Republican Party is in a time of crisis after election day. The base was more motivated this year, but the swing voters were motivated to vote for incumbents and the Democratic Party as a whole.

Bill Simon came out in a stealth campaign in the March primary. Many observers expected former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan to easily win the Republican gubernatorial primary, but Simon motivated the fringe of the GOP to pull for him in a low voter turnout election. Gray Davis is still unpopular according to opinion polls; he never received higher than a 45 percent job approval rating this year.

Voters wanted better candidates this election cycle. Many Democrats and independents wanted to vote for Riordan, the man that Bush operative Karl Rove wanted to win the state for the president. Instead, thanks in large part to a Davis-funded $10 million hit campaign on Riordan before the March primary, the state GOP fielded a novice candidate who was running against a thirty-year plus veteran of politics. What did Bill Simon do right this election cycle?

Compared to 1998 Republican gubernatorial candidate Dan Lungren, Bill Simon got the base out to vote for him. The base is composed of the dedicated activists who are the lifeblood of its party. Simon got the values crowd, the gun rights people and the conservatives to come out for him. What did Bill Simon do so wrong that caused him to lose this year?

Simon first had the income tax scandal; Gray Davis pressured Simon to release his tax forms to see if Simon was hiding anything. Then, Simon had a lawsuit against him with one of his business dealings for $78 million in July that made voters think that Simon was an inept executive.

Even though the lawsuit was overturned, people still thought of that verdict. The recent stories on corporate fraud and greed made it a bad time for people in business to run for office because of the downturn in the economy. Political candidates know that in campaigning the first to define his or her opponent has an advantage in keeping that picture in the minds of voters until the election.

Bill Simon also alienated his base by trying to outreach to swing voters with the California Log Cabin Republicans, an organization of gay and lesbian Republicans and their allies.

The Log Cabin Republicans sent Bill Simon the group’s questionnaire, and Simon surprisingly said that he would sign a proclamation for Gay Pride Day and support domestic partner benefits. The news of this development infuriated the values community from Lou Sheldon to Randy Thomasson, and the base was devastated. Bill Simon then decided to close his bridge to the moderates and swing voters by disavowing that he ever did sign that questionnaire. Bill Simon had a chance to reach out to a wide audience, but he was stuck with his political bedfellows for times of good and bad.

A strategy that could help California Republicans in 2006 is examining how Linda Lingle, Mitt Romney and George Pataki won their respective gubernatorial elections in Hawaii, Massachusetts and New York, respectively.

These individuals courted everyone that made up their party and reached out to the other side to achieve victory in their states. Courting voters that want to ban abortion, legalize discrimination against homosexuals and own firearms without restrictions may bring hardcore members of the GOP to the polls, but it certainly does not enhance the turnout of independents and weak partisans. The idea of “Inclusion Wins” is only the first step towards Republican victory, but the next step is to also carry on the good fight.

Voters want substance, they do not want to hear the typical sound byte platitudes. California may be facing a horrific budget deficit, but there was no good argument to elect Bill Simon even though Gray Davis was the culprit of many of these financial troubles. Let the Democrats implode on their own problems.