Ronald Reagan Centennial

It has been over one hundred years since Ronald Reagan was born, and the nation will be making a big deal about his birth and life story. I hope the good parts and the bad parts are both shown so we can have an honest portrayal.

I am starting my education journey to hopefully become a history teacher to teach grades 7-12 about history and American government. My inspiration is to make sure I do not become a teacher that tells why America is an evil nation, but I do not want to become a teacher that is just a cheerleader for American exceptionalism. I want to teach students about the big picture so there would be a holistic approach to my lessons.

Ronald Reagan was not perfect, but he was the man for his time. He may of made most of America feel good compared to the four years of the Carter Administration, but he marginalized others due to his connections with evangelicals and their hostility to LGBT people where many people who were alive during the Reagan years do blame the AIDS crisis on his administration where they believe if they were not in power not as many people would of died from the disease.

2 thoughts on “Ronald Reagan Centennial”

  1. Regarding an honest assessment of Reagan – I have become an admirer of Ron Reagan Jr. over the years, and his recent public statement regarding his suspicions about his father’s Alzheimer’s disease – namely, that Reagan Jr. was very worried after the Reagan-Mondale debate – is an outstanding example of how we should examine both the good and bad points of people. I’m not sure if the Reagan industry will clam up and stick to the official story that Reagan Sr. didn’t develop Alzheimer’s until long after he left office, but hopefully there is a place in which the issue could be studied objectively.

  2. Regarding an honest assessment of Reagan – I have become an admirer of Ron Reagan Jr. over the years, and his recent public statement regarding his suspicions about his father’s Alzheimer’s disease – namely, that Reagan Jr. was very worried after the Reagan-Mondale debate – is an outstanding example of how we should examine both the good and bad points of people. I’m not sure if the Reagan industry will clam up and stick to the official story that Reagan Sr. didn’t develop Alzheimer’s until long after he left office, but hopefully there is a place in which the issue could be studied objectively.

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